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A Minneapolis Architect Is Familiar With the Designs of the 1950’s

October 1, 2016 | Comment

Any Minneapolis architect knows that a newly constructed building has to fit the architectural landscape of the area where it is located. This is why they have to possess solid knowledge on history of architecture, styles specific to the 6th decade of the 20th century included. Here are some of them:
Minneapolis residential design Suburban planning derived from one of the most important architectural currents of that time, the auto-centric design. It emerged as a great number of people who earned very well moved in the suburbs and they needed to commute to their jobs in the city. The homes featuring this style incorporated built-in garages. As for the public buildings, like schools, they had only one storey. Another distinctive element was the network of covered paths and alleys connecting different parts of a building.
 As a result of more and more people affording to buy an automobile, a major architectural style, the auto-centric style, appeared. Its creators had automobile owners’ needs in mind when they designed the plans of streets and buildings. The auto-centric architecture features elements considered innovative for that period, like ramps with a concentric design that allowed easy access for cars, or underground parkings. One of the results of this style’s popularity, a Minneapolis architect may tell you, was the apparition of drive-ins.
Some of the Terms a Minneapolis Architect Uses in Describing the Parts of a Stair Rail
Just like in case of other professionals, a Minneapolis architect uses a specialized language when referring to different aspects of their work field. While the words are the same as those in everyday language, their meaning can be sometimes different.
Here are, for instance, some of the terms architects from Minneapolis and other Minnesota cities use for different components of a stair rail:
 Handrail – On one hand, it serves for increasing the structure’s level of stability. On the other hand, it is very useful in helping people living in the house to both climb the stairs and get down, as they grip it for support. The handrail is horizontally placed, and it incorporates curved portions called easing and inclined elements called raked rails.
 Newels – Conferring strength to the stair rail is the main role these parts play. They are vertically positioned and they are connected with both the stairs and the landings. The first newel in the row is called starting newel, and those situated against a wall are referred to as half newels.
 Balusters – Vertically placed, they offer support to the stair rail, also serving as decorative elements. Balusters come in a wide range of shapes. The building codes from Minnesota any Minneapolis architect is familiar with, say that a distance between two balusters has to be of less than 4 inches.

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